Internet of Things in Smart Grid

Internet of Things in Smart Grid is a connection of people and things anytime, anywhere,

with anyone and anything, using any network and any service. So IoT is a big global dynamic

Network infrastructure of Internet-enabled entities with web services. One of the most important

IoT applications are Smart Grid (SG). SG is an integrated data communication network

with the electricity grid to collect and analyze the data obtained from the transmission and distribution lines

substations and consumers. In this article, we talk about Internet of Things in Smart Grid and SG and their relationship. Some Internet of Things in Smart Grid

SG architectures, requirements for the use of IoT in SG, IoT applications and services in SG e

Challenges and future work are discussed. IoT Integration with the Smart Grid - Proche

Internet of Things in Smart Grid, it is worth exploring the evolution of

Internet. The first experimental two-computer network was created between the TX-2 computer

Lincoln Labs of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and operated Q-32 mainframe

by RAND companies through a dedicated telephone line in 1965 . The Internet was invented by

Vinton Cerf in 1973 . Commercial use of the Internet began in the late 1980s . TheWorldWide

The Web (WWW) was invented by Tim Berners-Lee in 1989 and was available in 1991 . First

The mobile phone with Internet connection was the Nokia 9000 Communicator, launched in Finland in

1996 . Therefore, the mobile Internet was formed. In June 2000, Friends Reunited was the first online social network

A network has been launched to gain relevance in Great Britain . Through emerging social networks, peoples

Identities are added to the Internet. In the next step in IoT, objects can connect and communicate

between them through the Internet. The smart grid is proposed to solve the problems of the electricity network (eg. Low reliability, high interruptions,

high emission of greenhouse gases and carbon, economy, energy security and security) . One of

The definition of smart grid is that the smart grid is a communication network on top of electricity

network to collect and analyze data from different components of an electricity network to predict energy supply

and the demand that can be used for energy management . For details and complete information

on SG characteristics and advantages, comparison between an electrical network and SG, and general

requirements of a communication network in an SG, readers can see chapter 3 of .

In a model proposed for the smart grid by the National Institute of Standards and Technology,

the smart grid has 7 domains and the functions of these domains are defined in such a way that the requested information can

The Smart Grid and Renewable Energy - IEEE Innovation at Work

communication network integrated with the electricity network to collect and analyze data

acquired from transmission lines, distribution substations and consumers. Based on these data, SG

it can provide predictive information to its suppliers and customers on how to better manage power.

Different levels of IoT architecture will be discussed in this article. We will look for technologies

which are essential for applying IoT to SG. Various IoT applications and services will be introduced in SG.

Finally, the challenges to be faced and future work are discussed.

The rest of the work is organized as follows. In section 2, IoT,

protocols) to a combination of social and technical problems (e.g. security). Internet of Things in Smart Grid represents a vision

where the Internet extends to the real world which includes all uniquely identifiable objects.

This vision is omnipresent computing. Initially, Mark Weiser  in 1991 coined the term “omnipresent”

Informatica “that IoT can really do. Kevin Ashton  proposed the term” IoT “in his

presentation to Procter & Gamble (P&G) in 1999. Furthermore, Neil Gershenfeld] used the same notion in

their book in 1999. IoT first became popular through Sarma et al.  (from the MIT Automatic Identification Center) in

2000. LG announced its first plans for the refrigerator on the Internet in 2000. In the period 2002-2004, IoT was mentioned.

in traditional publications such as Forbes , The Guardian , Scientific American] and The

Boston Globe . International Telecom Union (ITU) has published an annual IoT report ,

who expanded the IoT concept in 2005. In that report, there are four key factors for IoT:

Power grid monitoring | RMS on WebNMS IoT Platform

. Smart grid

The smart grid is proposed to solve the problems of the electricity network (eg. Low reliability, high interruptions,

high emission of greenhouse gases and carbon, economy, energy security and security) . One of

The definition of smart grid is that the smart grid is a communication network on top of electricity

network to collect and analyze data from different components of an electricity network to predict energy supply

and the demand that can be used for energy management . For details and complete information

on SG characteristics and advantages, comparison between an electrical network and SG, and general

requirements of a communication network in an SG, readers can see chapter 3 of .

In a model proposed for the smart grid by the National Institute of Standards and Technology,

the smart grid has 7 domains and the functions of these domains are defined in such a way that the requested information can

the necessary exchange and decisions can be made . Some of the functionality required for implementation

the smart grid is as follows :

 SG IoT applications and services

IoT can support SG technologies. Complete IoT detection and processing capabilities

It can improve SG skills, such as processing, alerting, self-healing, disaster recovery and reliability.

The combination of IoT and SG can greatly promote the development of intelligent terminals, meters and sensors,

computer equipment and communication devices. IoT can be used to obtain reliable data

Transmission in wireless and wired communication infrastructures in different parts of SG

generation, transmission, distribution and consumption / use lines) as follows:

1. In electricity generation, IoT can be used to monitor electricity generation from different types of

power plants (such as coal, wind, solar, biomass), gas emissions, energy storage, energy consumption,

and provide the power needed to provide consumers.

2. The IoT can be used to capture electricity consumption, send, monitor and protect the transmission

lines, substations and towers, management and control equipment.

3. IoT can be used on the client side in smart meters to measure different types of parameters,

intelligent energy consumption, interoperability between different networks, uploads and downloads

of electric vehicles, management of energy efficiency and energy demand

The main IoT application scenarios are as follows:

1. AMI with high reliability: AMI is a key component in SG. IoT can be used in AMI for collection

data, measure SG anomalies, exchange information between smart meters, check electricity

quality and distributed energy, analyze the user’s consumption model.

2. Smart home: a smart home can be used to interact with users and SG, improve SG services,

meet marketing demand, improve service quality, control smart devices, read energy consumption information

It is collected using smart meters and monitors renewable energy.

3. Supervision of the transmission line: through the use of broadband wireless communication technologies

Transmission lines can be monitored for error problems and corrected.

4. Auxiliary electric vehicle management system (EV): auxiliary electric vehicle management systems

They are part of the charging station, EV and monitoring center. With GPS, users can inspect nearby cargo

stations and their parking information. GPS will automatically guide drivers to the most suitable ones.

Loading station. The monitoring center manages car batteries, charging equipment, charging stations

and optimize resources

IoT architectures integrated in Smart Grid

Various IoT architectures have been proposed for integration into SG. They can be classified into

architectures with three or four layers [48–53] (see Table 1). In [48], three layers are proposed.

Level 1 includes smart meters, network devices and communication protocols. Level 2 contains

devices responsible for receiving data in the central system. Level 3 includes artificial

Intelligent systems to provide information to decision-making and billing systems.

Requirements for the use of IoT in SG

To use IoT in SG, we need to have some technologies and meet some requirements

listed as follows:

1. Communication technologies: communication technologies can be used to receive and

transmit acquired information on the status of SG devices. We have short and long haul

communication technology standards. ZigBee, Bluetooth and ultra broadband technologies are

examples of short-range communication technologies. For long range communications, power supply

line communications [54], optical fibers, wireless cellular networks such as 3G and 4G and satellite

Communications can be used.

2. Data merging techniques: from the resources of IoT terminals (such as batteries, memory and

bandwidth) are limited, not all information can be sent to the destination. Therefore, to increase the

efficiency of information collection, data fusion techniques can be used to collect and combine data.

3. Energy Harvesting Process: Since most IoT devices use the battery as one of the main ones

energy sources, the process of collecting energy is very important for IoT applications, for example using different

sensors and cameras to monitor different parts of an intelligent grid.